SEED PACKETS . . . ** consider a pesticide-free garden for the pollinators **

Here's more information about the seed packets handpacked by PoCo volunteers . . .
LARKSPUR (Delphinium)


POLLINATOR:  bumble bees, other insects

 

Larkspur flowers provide spring nectar for pollinators.  

 

The easiest way to grow Larkspur is to sow the seeds in a garden bed in the summer or fall (as nature will do with your future plants).  If the garden is in Zone 8 or warmer, the seeds will sprout in early winter and be small evergreen plants until spring when they grow rapidly. 

 

As with most annual plants, for lush flowers and seed production, planting in amended soil with weekly watering will give best results.  However, the plants will survive on very little water.   

Cosmos (Cosmos sulphureus)

POLLINATOR:  bees, other insects

 

Cosmos are easy to grow annual flowers that provide a lot of nectar for pollinators as well as visual beauty to a garden.  Since pollinators enjoy dense plantings, Cosmos plants growing in the middle of perennials works well.  In early winter, the entire plant can be removed easily. 

As with most annual plants, for lush flowers and seed production, planting in amended soil with weekly watering will give best results.  However, the plants will survive on very little water.

 

California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica)

POLLINATOR:  bees

 

Poppies are called a child of autumn, as they begin growing in Fall as a small plant sending down a deep tap root in the winter, ready to heavily bloom in spring.  

 

Sow the small seeds in full sun under small-sized gravel or sandy loam soil in the Fall. Once established, they are quite drought tolerant and require no fertilizer.   

Arizona Milkweed
(Asclepias angustifolia)

POLLINATOR:  bees and other insects

Arizona milkweed is a rare plant in the wild that is surprisingly easy to grow.  Once it is established in a garden, many volunteer plants will come up nearby.  It is a great nectar plant for all pollinators as well as the host plant for Monarch and Queen butterflies.

To mimic its native habitat of riparian woodlands and mountain canyons, plant seeds in amended soil, in sun to part shade, giving medium water.  Plants will grow 1-3 feet tall and wide, depending on available water and richness of soil.  Cold stratification of seeds is not necessary.  This video by SW Monarch Study is very helpful.

Parry's Penstemon (Penstemon parryi)


POLLINATOR:  hummingbirds, insects

 

When this penstemon starts to bloom, the northbound hummingbird migration is on!  These plants are considered short-lived perennials (living 3-4 years) that bloom the second year.  

Sow the seeds in sandy loam soil or under small-sized gravel in full sun during summer or fall (as nature will do with your future plants).  If the garden is in Zone 8 or warmer, the seeds will sprout in early winter and be short evergreen rosettes until early spring when they rapidly send up tall flower stalks. 

Hooker's Evening Primrose
(Oenothera elata)


POLLINATOR:  moths

With medium water, this tough perennial plant can grow up to 4' tall.  The flowers, with lots of sticky pollen, open at dusk and start to wilt at dawn. Easily reseeds.  

 

The plant starts out as a flat rosette, then sends up a tall flower stalk.  Heavy seeder -- birds will pull apart the seed pods to eat the tiny seeds so leave the pods on the plant through winter.  

© 2019 Pollinator Corridors Inc. (doing business as Pollinator Corridors Southwest) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.   EIN:  47-3801543

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